Coronavirus

 All current and updated Coronavirus information is available on:

https://www.gov.uk/coronavirus 

Current level for COVID-19 in our area see below

High alert COVID 19

Do not leave your home if you have coronavirus symptoms

Do not leave your home if you have either:

  • a high temperature
  • a new, continuous cough
  • a loss of, or change to, your sense of smell or taste

    Get a test and stay at home!

To protect others, do not go to places like a GP surgery, pharmacy or hospital. Stay at home.

Use the 111 online coronavirus service to find out what to do.

https://111.nhs.uk/covid-19/

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-getting-tested

Managing your health at home

The coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak means you should only leave your home if it's essential, unless you feel very unwell or you are told to attend an existing appointment for ongoing treatment.

While you are at home it's still easy to get NHS help using your smartphone, tablet or computer. The Health at Home webpage has information letting you know how to:


◦contact your GP
◦order repeat prescriptions
◦manage long-term conditions
◦maintain your mental and physical wellbeing

If you need an NHS service, try to do it online first. If you cannot get what you need this way try asking a friend or family member to help you, or speak to us on the phone.

Find out more at: https://www.nhs.uk/health-at-home/ 

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-stay-at-home-guidance

COVID19 Advice for Parents

COVID 19 Advice for parents with children under 5yrs

COVID Recovery:

Your Covid Recovery is a new NHS website designed to help people recover from the long-term effects of coronavirus, otherwise known as Covid-19.


If you have had Covid-19, you may still have some physical symptoms, such as, breathlessness, a cough and a lack of energy. You may also have psychological symptoms, such as feeling scared or anxious, depressed, having trouble sleeping and struggling to remember or concentrate.


These symptoms, both physical and psychological, are common. Your Covid Recovery includes information from experts about how to manage them and look after your health and wellbeing. It also includes information on returning to work, and a helpful section for family, friends and carers of people who are recovering.


https://www.yourcovidrecovery.nhs.uk/

Shielding For Children:

Children (0-18) and shielding – 6 July update

The majority of children who have been previously identified as ‘clinically extremely vulnerable’ will no longer need to shield.

Does my child need to continue shielding?

Children should continue to shield until 31 July. From Saturday 1 August, the guidance will be paused so clinically vulnerable people of all ages will no longer need to be advised to shield.

Children will only be removed from the shielded patient list by their GP or specialist doctor following consultation with the child and their family. Specialists and GPs will be asked to contact children and their families to discuss this over the summer. Families do not need to take any immediate action. We expect these consultations to happen over the summer.

Children who are removed will not be advised to shield again if government guidance on shielding is changed in the future.

If your child is transitioning to adult services before 31 July, you should have a discussion with their current and future specialist to determine whether your child should continue shielding.

GPs and specialist clinicians have been informed of the changing guidance.

Why is this changing?

The original shielded patients list was intended to identify people with conditions that put them at highest clinical risk from Covid-19, based on the evidence available at the time. It was developed early in the outbreak when there was less evidence and data on the groups most at risk from Covid-19.

Specialists in the Royal College of Paediatric and Child Health (RCPCH) have looked at the most recent evidence specific to children and developed specific guidance. The Chief Medical Officer and senior clinicians have reviewed the guidance and are confident in their findings and advice.

The latest evidence shows that risks to children are low and only those with a certain medical conditions are likely to be advised to shield if shielding needs to be reintroduced in the future.

Can my child return to school/nursery?

Children should continue to shield until 31 July. From 1 August, following the pausing of guidance, children will be able to return to school or nursey in line with their peers and school terms.

More information

Royal College of Paediatric and Child Health (RCPCH) guidance: https://www.rcpch.ac.uk/resources/covid-19-shielding-guidance-children-young-people#introduction

Shielding guidance: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/guidance-on-shielding-and-protecting-extremely-vulnerable-persons-from-covid-19

Education guidance: https://www.gov.uk/coronavirus/education-and-childcare

Mental health and wellbeing advice: https://www.nhs.uk/oneyou/every-mind-matters/

Shielding for extremely vulnerable patients:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/guidance-on-shielding-and-protecting-extremely-vulnerable-persons-from-covid-19/guidance-on-shielding-and-protecting-extremely-vulnerable-persons-from-covid-19

The below information has been taken from https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/ 

Stay at home to stop coronavirus spreading

Everyone must stay at home to help stop the spread of coronavirus.

You should only leave your home for very limited purposes:

  • shopping for basic necessities, for example food and medicine, which must be as infrequent as possible
  • one form of exercise a day, for example a run, walk, or cycle – alone or with members of your household
  • any medical need, including to donate blood, avoid or escape risk of injury or harm, or to provide care or to help a vulnerable person
  • travelling for work purposes, but only where you cannot work from home

Important

These reasons are exceptions – even when doing these activities, you should be minimising time spent outside of the home and ensuring you are 2 metres apart from anyone outside of your household.

There is separate advice:

See https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/ 

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/north-west-of-england-local-restrictions-what-you-can-and-cannot-do?fbclid=IwAR2arz9l5mEH2wHPaPJexlvJXihDKvUkpbXFQz0jkSuLC0ac1HZ5gYB6aa8

What to do if you need medical help

If you need medical help for any reason, do not go to places like a GP surgery, pharmacy or hospital.

If you have symptoms of coronavirus (a high temperature or a new, continuous cough), use the 111 coronavirus service.

If you need help or advice not related to coronavirus:

  • for health information and advice, use the NHS website or your GP surgery website
  • for urgent medical help, use the NHS 111 online service – only call 111 if you're unable to get help online
  • for life-threatening emergencies, call 999 for an ambulance

Coronavirus can make anyone seriously ill. But some people are at a higher risk and need to take extra steps to avoid becoming unwell.

People at increased risk

You may be at increased risk from coronavirus if you:

  • are 70 or older
  • are pregnant
  • have a condition that may increase your risk from coronavirus

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/making-a-support-bubble-with-another-household

Looking after yourself and your baby in pregnancy

 Parent Information for Newborn Babies

How to protect yourself from coronavirus

The advice for people who may be at increased risk from coronavirus is the same as for most other people.

You should only leave the house for very limited purposes:

  • shopping for basic necessities, for example food and medicine, which must be as infrequent as possible
  • one form of exercise a day, for example a run, walk, or cycle – alone or with members of your household
  • any medical need, including to donate blood, avoid or escape risk of injury or harm, or to provide care or to help a vulnerable person
  • travelling for work purposes, but only where you cannot work from home

Face Coverings

Please see the link below for further information on when to wear a face covering.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/face-coverings-when-to-wear-one-and-how-to-make-your-own

People most at risk

People most at risk from coronavirus are sometimes called "shielded" or "extremely vulnerable" people.

This includes people who:

  • have had an organ transplant
  • are having certain types of cancer treatment
  • have blood or bone marrow cancer, such as leukaemia
  • have a severe lung condition, such as cystic fibrosis or severe asthma
  • have a condition or are taking medicine that makes them much more likely to get infections
  • are pregnant and have a serious heart condition
Information:

People most at risk are being contacted by the NHS.

Speak to your GP or care team if you have not been contacted and think you should have been.

How to protect yourself from coronavirus

People most at risk from coronavirus need to take extra steps to avoid getting it. This is known as "shielding".

It's recommended you follow this advice for at least 12 weeks.

Self-isolation helps stop coronavirus spreading

If you have COVID-19 symptoms or have received a positive test result

Stay at home and begin to self-isolate for 10 days from when your symptoms start. Arrange to have a test for COVID-19 if you have not already had one. The result of the test will determine how long you must stay at home and self-isolate.

Stay at home while you are waiting for a home test kit or a test site appointment.

A positive test result means you must complete a 10-day isolation period.

If your test is negative, you can stop self-isolating as long as you are well.

If you do not have symptoms but have tested positive for COVID-19, stay at home and self-isolate for 10 days from the day the test was taken. If you develop symptoms after your test, restart your 10-day isolation period from the day the symptoms start.

Stay as far away from other members of your household as possible, especially if they are clinically extremely vulnerable. Avoid using shared spaces such as kitchens and other living areas while others are present and take your meals back to your room to eat.

You could be fined if you do not stay at home and self-isolate following a positive test result for COVID-19 and you are notified by NHS Test and Trace that you need to self-isolate.

If you live in the same household as someone with COVID-19

Stay at home for 14 days. The 14-day period starts from the day the first person in your house developed symptoms or, if they do not have symptoms, from the day their test was taken.

If you do not have symptoms of COVID-19 yourself you do not need a test. Only arrange a test if you develop COVID-19 symptoms.

If you develop symptoms and your test result is positive, follow the same advice for people with COVID-19 to stay at home and self-isolate for 10 days from when your symptoms started, regardless of where you are in your 14-day period.

You could be fined if you are identified as a contact of someone with COVID-19 and you are notified by NHS Test and Trace that you need to self-isolate and do not to stay at home and self-isolate.

Get an isolation note to give to your employer

If you live with someone who has symptoms of coronavirus, you can get an isolation note to send to your employer as proof you need to stay off work.

You do not need to get a note from a GP - https://111.nhs.uk/isolation-note/ 

If you're self-employed or a member of a partnership and have been adversely affected by coronavirus (COVID-19) find out if you can use this scheme to claim a grant using the link below.

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/claim-a-grant-through-the-coronavirus-covid-19-self-employment-income-support-scheme

If you have symptoms and live with a vulnerable person

If you live with someone who is 70 or over, has a long-term condition, is pregnant or has a weakened immune system, try to arrange for them to stay with friends or family for 14 days.

If you have to stay at home together, try to keep 2 metres (3 steps) away from each other. If possible, try not to share a bed.

Treating coronavirus symptoms at home

To help yourself stay well while you're at home:

  • rest and sleep
  • drink plenty of water to avoid dehydration – drink enough so your pee is light yellow and clear
  • take paracetamol to lower your temperature

24 hr Mental Health Helpline


A 24 hour mental health helpline, offering confidential help and advice, to anyone registered with a GP in Calderdale, Kirklees, Wakefield and Barnsley.

 The service supports people who are:
◦At risk of developing mental health problems
◦Diagnosed common mental health problems.
◦Known to mental health services.
◦Experiencing mental health distress.
◦Seeking information, advice and support.

The service provides a listening ear, emotional support and guidance to other services for both individuals and their carers. You do not have to have used mental health services before to call.

 Telephone: FREEPHONE 0800 183 0558
 Hours: 24 hours a day, 7 days a week



 
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