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Coronavirus

Managing your health at home

The coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak means you should only leave your home if it's essential, unless you feel very unwell or you are told to attend an existing appointment for ongoing treatment.

While you are at home it's still easy to get NHS help using your smartphone, tablet or computer. The Health at Home webpage has information letting you know how to:


◦contact your GP
◦order repeat prescriptions
◦manage long-term conditions
◦maintain your mental and physical wellbeing

If you need an NHS service, try to do it online first. If you cannot get what you need this way try asking a friend or family member to help you, or speak to us on the phone.

Find out more at: https://www.nhs.uk/health-at-home/ 

The below information has been taken from https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/ 

Do not leave your home if you have coronavirus symptoms

Do not leave your home if you have either:

  • a high temperature – this means you feel hot to touch on your chest or back (you do not need to measure your temperature)
  • a new, continuous cough – this means coughing a lot for more than an hour, or 3 or more coughing episodes in 24 hours (if you usually have a cough, it may be worse than usual)

To protect others, do not go to places like a GP surgery, pharmacy or hospital. Stay at home.

Use the 111 online coronavirus service to find out what to do.

https://111.nhs.uk/covid-19/

Stay at home to stop coronavirus spreading

Everyone must stay at home to help stop the spread of coronavirus.

You should only leave your home for very limited purposes:

  • shopping for basic necessities, for example food and medicine, which must be as infrequent as possible
  • one form of exercise a day, for example a run, walk, or cycle – alone or with members of your household
  • any medical need, including to donate blood, avoid or escape risk of injury or harm, or to provide care or to help a vulnerable person
  • travelling for work purposes, but only where you cannot work from home

Important

These reasons are exceptions – even when doing these activities, you should be minimising time spent outside of the home and ensuring you are 2 metres apart from anyone outside of your household.

There is separate advice:

See https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/ 

What to do if you need medical help

If you need medical help for any reason, do not go to places like a GP surgery, pharmacy or hospital.

If you have symptoms of coronavirus (a high temperature or a new, continuous cough), use the 111 coronavirus service.

If you need help or advice not related to coronavirus:

  • for health information and advice, use the NHS website or your GP surgery website
  • for urgent medical help, use the NHS 111 online service – only call 111 if you're unable to get help online
  • for life-threatening emergencies, call 999 for an ambulance

Coronavirus can make anyone seriously ill. But some people are at a higher risk and need to take extra steps to avoid becoming unwell.

People at increased risk

You may be at increased risk from coronavirus if you:

  • are 70 or older
  • are pregnant
  • have a condition that may increase your risk from coronavirus

Looking after yourself and your baby in pregnancy

 Parent Information for Newborn Babies

How to protect yourself from coronavirus

The advice for people who may be at increased risk from coronavirus is the same as for most other people.

You should only leave the house for very limited purposes:

  • shopping for basic necessities, for example food and medicine, which must be as infrequent as possible
  • one form of exercise a day, for example a run, walk, or cycle – alone or with members of your household
  • any medical need, including to donate blood, avoid or escape risk of injury or harm, or to provide care or to help a vulnerable person
  • travelling for work purposes, but only where you cannot work from home

People most at risk

People most at risk from coronavirus are sometimes called "shielded" or "extremely vulnerable" people.

This includes people who:

  • have had an organ transplant
  • are having certain types of cancer treatment
  • have blood or bone marrow cancer, such as leukaemia
  • have a severe lung condition, such as cystic fibrosis or severe asthma
  • have a condition or are taking medicine that makes them much more likely to get infections
  • are pregnant and have a serious heart condition
Information:

People most at risk are being contacted by the NHS.

Speak to your GP or care team if you have not been contacted and think you should have been.

How to protect yourself from coronavirus

People most at risk from coronavirus need to take extra steps to avoid getting it. This is known as "shielding".

It's recommended you follow this advice for at least 12 weeks.

Self-isolation helps stop coronavirus spreading

Do not leave your home if you have symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19) or live with someone who does.

This is called self-isolation.

If you are self-isolating, you must:

  • not leave your home for any reason, other than to exercise once a day – but stay at least 2 metres (3 steps) away from other people
  • not go out to buy food or collect medicine – order them by phone or online, or ask someone else to drop them off at your home
  • not have visitors, such as friends and family, in your home

You can use your garden, if you have one.

How long to self-isolate

If you have symptoms

If you have symptoms of coronavirus, you'll need to self-isolate for 7 days.

After 7 days:

  • if you do not have a high temperature, you do not need to self-isolate
  • if you still have a high temperature, keep self-isolating until your temperature returns to normal

You do not need to self-isolate if you just have a cough after 7 days. A cough can last for several weeks after the infection has gone.

If you live with someone who has symptoms

If you live with someone who has symptoms, you'll need to self-isolate for 14 days from the day their symptoms started. This is because it can take 14 days for symptoms to appear.

If more than 1 person at home has symptoms, self-isolate for 14 days from the day the first person started having symptoms.

If you get symptoms, self-isolate for 7 days from when your symptoms start, even if it means you're self-isolating for longer than 14 days.

If you do not get symptoms, you can stop self-isolating after 14 days.

Get an isolation note to give to your employer

If you live with someone who has symptoms of coronavirus, you can get an isolation note to send to your employer as proof you need to stay off work.

You do not need to get a note from a GP - https://111.nhs.uk/isolation-note/ 

If you have symptoms and live with a vulnerable person

If you live with someone who is 70 or over, has a long-term condition, is pregnant or has a weakened immune system, try to arrange for them to stay with friends or family for 14 days.

If you have to stay at home together, try to keep 2 metres (3 steps) away from each other. If possible, try not to share a bed.

Treating coronavirus symptoms at home

To help yourself stay well while you're at home:

  • rest and sleep
  • drink plenty of water to avoid dehydration – drink enough so your pee is light yellow and clear
  • take paracetamol to lower your temperature

24 hr Mental Health Helpline


A 24 hour mental health helpline, offering confidential help and advice, to anyone registered with a GP in Calderdale, Kirklees, Wakefield and Barnsley.

 The service supports people who are:
◦At risk of developing mental health problems
◦Diagnosed common mental health problems.
◦Known to mental health services.
◦Experiencing mental health distress.
◦Seeking information, advice and support.

The service provides a listening ear, emotional support and guidance to other services for both individuals and their carers. You do not have to have used mental health services before to call.

 Telephone: FREEPHONE 0800 183 0558
 Hours: 24 hours a day, 7 days a week



 
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